Reappraising the Pharisees

The May 7-9 conference at the Gregorian University, entitled “Jesus and the Pharisees: an interdisciplinary reappraisal,” aimed to challenge negative stereotypes that have built up over the centuries about the Pharisees, inviting Christians to take a more appreciative look based on the results of modern Biblical scholarship.

The conference featured scholars from both the Jewish and Christian traditions from Argentina, Austria, Canada, Colombia, Germany, India, Israel, Italy, Netherlands, and the United States, and Sister Clare Jardine of the Sion Congregational Leadership Team participated in all three days.

The Pharisees were an ancient Jewish religious movement that more or less disappeared almost 2,000 years ago, and are seen today as having laid the intellectual, legal and ritual basis for modern Judaism.

The conference first dealt with the possible origins and meanings of the name “Pharisee” in different languages. It then examined the various ancient sources about the Pharisees: Josephus, Qumran, archaeological data, the New Testament, and Rabbinic literature.

After a round table discussion of the results concerning the “historical” Pharisees, the second part of the conference was devoted to the history of interpretation and its effects, from Patristic literature, to Medieval Jewish interpretations, to passion plays, films, religion text books, and homiletics.

Although the word “Pharisee” means “one who is separated for a life of purity” (derived from the Hebrew: פרוש parush), the term is commonly used derogatively to denote a self-righteous or hypocritical person. In his presentation, Carmelite Father Craig Morrison said “Often in preaching and teaching, we’re unaware of the caricature we create about this most interesting group of religious people.” The academic proceedings concluded by looking at possible ways to represent the Pharisees less inadequately in the future.

Sister Clare Jardine met Pope Francis during a private audience.

Sister Clare said that it was very stimulating to listen to in-depth research on this important topic, and hoped that “bringing together international scholarship of Jews and Christians will give an impetus to revising the current general portrayal of the Pharisees.”

The conference reached a crescendo on Thursday with a private audience with Pope Francis. The event also marked the 110th anniversary of the founding of the Pontifical Biblical Institute by Pope Pius X in 1909.

Education for Action: the urgency of interreligious leadership for global good

The power of interfaith leadership in bringing about positive change in global challenges was the focus of the panel Sister Lucy Thorson from Canada took part in at the international Education for Action conference in Rome.

The interactive panel at the John Paul II Center for Interreligious Dialogue.

The event, attended by over 150 people, marked the 10th anniversary of the Interreligious Program at the John Paul II Center of the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Rome. It involved leaders on interreligious dialogue from the USA, Canada, Palestine, Holland, and Rome, whose interfaith experience spans Christianity, Judaism, Islam and Buddhism, among others.

Sister Lucy was on an interactive panel that debated how interfaith leaders can move from study to practice, activate networks, and instigate impactful actions that address current global challenges.

Alongside Lucy were: Huda Abuarquob, Regional Director of the Alliance for Middle East Peace; Aart Bos, CEO of MasterPeace; and Joyce Dubensky, CEO of the Tanenbaum Center for Interreligious Understanding, who also acted as moderator.

The speakers: Joyce Dubensky, Aart Bos, Huda Abuarquob and Lucy Thorson.

The panel explored the question: how can knowledge about different belief traditions be translated into mutual collaborative action to resolve conflicts in a peaceful way? The speakers drew from their experiences in the Middle East and with refugees and immigrants. The bottom-up approach of grassroots peace movements was given due credit, based on the assertion that everyone has a contribution to make.

Ways of involving young adults in the world’s contemporary conflicts were also confronted. The panel reflected on the role of education and awareness-raising in schools, to create a new generation of interfaith leaders, and ensure that interfaith dialogue becomes and remains standard practice in the global arena.

Lucy stressed that today interfaith dialogue and collaborative action are a necessity, not a luxury.

Sister Lucy brought to the table her many years of experience in ministry as a Sion Sister in Israel and Rome. During her seventeen years in Jerusalem, she served as President of the Ecumenical Theological Fraternity in Israel. And in Rome, she was Director of SIDIC – an International Centre for Jewish-Christian relations established in 1965 at the request of the Second Vatican Council Fathers.

Lucy spoke about the Sion vision of interfaith relations and, in concrete terms, the social and cultural initiatives carried out in Sion schools and adult study centres all over the world. She said that education must give future leaders a solid grounding in interreligious action, for the greater common good. “I am convinced,” said Sister Lucy, “that today interfaith dialogue and collaborative action are a necessity, not a luxury.”

Participants networked at the “marketplace of ideas”.

As well as a series of panels, a “marketplace of ideas” with twenty stands was a lively hive of discussion. During these informal exchanges, alumni, religious and lay participants alike echoed the importance of education as the basis for action in interreligious relations.

Dialogue and justice: it’s the relationship that matters

On 29 April Sister Therese Fitzgerald, Irish Sion member, gave a talk on how right relationships lie at the core of both dialogue and justice, at the annual conference of SEDOS (Service of Documentation and Studies on Global Mission) in Ariccia, Italy.

The five-day event on “Mission in a Pluralisitic World” involved speakers with experience and knowledge on missionary challenges from Egypt, Belgium, Germany, Italy and Ireland. The main themes treated were Freedom and Islam, Charity and Buddhism, and Justice and Judaism.

Sister Therese spoke about her experiences in Dublin, Ireland, where she is engaged in dialogue through the Council of Christians and Jews. She also leads biblical reflections using Jewish sources in parishes and works as a councellor.

Her presentation started by looking at Austrian-born Israeli Jewish philosopher Martin Buber’s definition of dialogue as “the ground of self-realisation”. By entering into dialogue, she explained, you can grow more fully into your own identity, whilst at the same time becoming more open to developments and difference. This takes awareness and listening skills, as well as an attitude of openness towards the people involved and what may emerge as the dialogue progresses.

Sister Therese Fitzgerald argued the importance of “right relationships” at SEDOS.

But the benefits of dialogue reach far beyond self-realisation. Therese went on to show how, from a broader perspective, awareness and listening are key to achieving justice for all people and our planet in the long term. She examined how the relational aspects of justice and the pathways towards embracing them are rooted in the Bible, and considered the importance of “right relationships” with reference to the phrase “righteousness and justice” in Genesis 18:19. This, she explained, provides a basis around which justice, as a way of being in the world, can be explored.

The talk concluded that dialogue and justice both need to be based on a desire to be in right relationships with others: with God, oneself, other people and the environment. And right relationships assume a way of relating that respects and supports human rights and protects the dignity of all creation.

In a final call-to-action, Therese urged: “For a vision of right relationships to exist, where all people and the planet have their needs met, we must create and develop just structures that ensure long-term results for a better world.”

Sister Clare Jardine and Sister Nayeli Mendez Serrano discussed the impact of dialogue in their ministry during an interval.

Therese’s approach to the debate on religious pluralism provoked interesting questions and comments from conference participants. Marist Sister Nayeli Mendez Serrano, who meets people from different backgrounds in her ministry as a nurse in Mexico, said that she felt motivated to engage more in ecumenism and interreligious dialogue in the hospital where she works. “I am going to listen more,” she said, “and try to create an atmosphere of respect and openness to others.”

Another participant, Sister Maria Hornung, has worked with Interfaith Philadelphia for fourteen years, and is involved in a programme called “Growing Spiritually Together” in a shelter for homeless and substance-dependent women. She said that Therese’s presentation was the perfect backdrop for the life of engagement of the four panelists who spoke of their being drawn into the mission of interfaith relations and how this ministry had changed them, as it had changed her. She took away with her from the SEDOS conference a sense of hope and a notion of how blessed she and all participants are “to be a part of this aspect of Christ’s universal presence”.

Father Peter Baekelmans, Director of SEDOS, said he hoped that the seminar would encourage missionary congregations in the Church to be actively involved in interreligious dialogue.

A heartfelt goodbye and a move to new horizons in justice and reconciliation in Canada

The house where Sister Bernadette and Sister Margaret lived for 38 of their 40 years in Winnipeg

After four decades of opening their hearts and home to neighbours in Winnipeg, Canada, Sister Bernadette O’Reilly and Sister Margaret Hughes made a 800-kilometre journey at the end of April, to join the Saskatoon community of the Sion Congregation.

For 40 years the Sisters were actively involved in Rossbrook House, a Winnipeg neighbourhood drop-in centre for children and youth located in a former church. Sister Bernadette served as Co-Director for more than 20 years and Sister Margaret taught at its Indigenous alternative schools.

The congregation first established a presence in Winnipeg in 1979 because they wanted to live and work in solidarity with people deprived of basic human rights. A group of sisters immediately joined the work at Rossbrook House, which had begun three years earlier under a simple mission: “No child who does not want to be alone, should ever have to be”.

Phil Chiappetta, Executive Director of Rossbrook House, said that the sisters leave a huge legacy, having mentored thousands of children. “There was always a crowd of children and youth around them, because they reflected all the preciousness of each child back at them.”

As those children grew up, some stayed as volunteers or staff and worked alongside the sisters. Property co-ordinator Lloyd Michaud studied with Sister Bernadette at Rising Sun, an alternative high school, and was first hired at Rossbrook at the age of 15. “If it wasn’t for them,” he said, “I don’t know where I would be today.”

After half a lifetime in Winnipeg, both sisters are convinced their legacy will not be the programmes and schools they have started, but the relationships they have nurtured. They are confident that the work at Rossbrook will continue in its own way.

“It’s been a blessing to be here,” said Sister Bernadette. “I think the thing that makes (leaving) easy is nothing we’ve started is going to end when we leave.”

Neither sister is retiring, saying they will look for new opportunities to work for justice and reconciliation in Saskatoon.

“We love what we do,” said Sister Bernadette. “As long as we can, we will.”

Adapted from an article by Brenda Suderman in the Winnipeg Free Press.

We are Sion – International Youth Meeting in Costa Rica

A workshop on the connections between different faiths.

Twelve to eighteen-year-old Sion students from four continents gathered between the 6 and the 14 of April in Costa Rica to reflect together on the charism of Sion and the different realities of Sion youth across the globe. The aim was to create bonds and fraternity that encourage them to be agents of change in their countries.

Among the topics under debate was how the charism of Sion affects the lives of the young participants. The week-long journey took them through an analysis of the needs, limitations, similarities and differences within the Sion student community, and from this starting point they developed their common and diverse dreams.

“A happy place” was how Jemel Johnson, 13-year-old student from Notre Dame de Sion School in Kansas City, USA, described the meeting. “I learned more about the cultures of other places and what other Sion schools are like” he said.

Students overcame language barriers and formed new friendships.

This cultural exchange was not without its challenges, given that the students from Costa Rica, Brazil, France, USA and Australia were communicating with each other in four different languages. “It was not always easy to communicate with each other,” commented Sigurd Ramos Marin, Principal of the Colegio Nuestra Señora de Sion in Moravia and host of the event.

Jemel said he’d picked up a little bit of Portuguese from the Brazilians and expanded his knowledge of French from the students from Paris.

But the students, teachers and organizers involved rose above the barriers of the spoken language and, according to Ramos Marin, “always understood each other thanks to the language that all the students of Sion practice: love.”

At the end of the week the participants made commitments to take away with them and follow through in their home countries.

Jemel is quite clear about the pledge he has made. “Back home,” he said, “I’m going to try not to be as judgmental as I might have been before. I will try to be more peaceful, more calm, and more understanding of other people’s feelings by putting myself in their shoes.”

Somos Sion!

Overall, the Notre Dame de Sion Congregational Schools Team that sponsored the event considers it an achievement of great spiritual and intellectual enrichment, and sees nothing more satisfying than the knowledge that Sion students all over the world share the same guiding principles.

As yet, another gathering has not been scheduled, but students, directors and teachers expressed unanimous hope that the experience would be repeated within the next three years, and that next time it might involve more of the 22 Sion schools around the world.

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